Books

Through the years, I have visited with family that I didn’t even know that I had. In turn my correspondence has been exhaustive at times. I so enjoy sending out and receiving family information. The mail holds so many surprises. Oh, the crazy things that one finds out while searching out the family’s roots.

 

The information compiled in the volume is the family history of my sister-in-law, Elda Janna Cowne.  She has provided me with starting information on which I was able to build.  It includes a tremendous amount of research done by her father and others, I added to some and included some updates.

We have found through our search that we are extremely distant cousins (20th cousins to be precise), the common ancestor being, Edward I Longshanks, King of England.

In 1750 when Dr. Thomas Walker  traveled through the area now known as Lee Co., VA, his part began their journey by following, what is now known as the Wilderness Trail.  Beginning their trek at the New River (near wht is present day Blacksburg ) continuing on to (current day) Wytheville, to Abingdon, to the Block House (present day Kingsport) on the Holston River. They journeyed on to Rogersville, Sneedville, on the Clinch. They then crossed from Blackwater over the mountains into Virginia. After crossing the Beargrass River (known today as the Powell River) they passed through Jonesville.  They continued westward on to Indian Creek, near Ewing. They followed Indian Creek on towards the Cumberland Gap and on into Kentucky.

The journeys of the longhunters began much earlier than 1760, beginning with their immigration to the colonies.  They by their very nature were adventurers who were able to take naturally to the wilderness like an Indian or wolf.  They cherished freedom, solitude, and the wilderness.  Possessing an unwillingness to live “cooped-up” in towns or settlements, this led to their ever increasing penetration into the wilderness.  They led the way to where others would only later venture in years to come.

I began working with my good friend Marion on her own genealogy.  This particular volume has sort of “stalled out”.  Obtaining any type of lead from her family is difficult and would actually require a major trip to Massachusetts.  According to their family’s oral history, Johnny Appleseed is their gggggrand Uncle.  This particular bit of family lore is intriguing, however, I haven’t even been able to make it past their great grandparents.  They just aren’t interested.  Maybe some day their children will be more involved

My journey into the families within the pages of this volume began innocently enough.  It was my desire to set down the ancestry of my husband for our children.  That simple goal has however, turned into a true expedition through the pages of history.  Let me briefly introduce you to several of the more colorful characters that you will find amongst the pages of this volume.  They are Capt. William Garton, William Mabe; Col. Martin Van Buren Mabe and his housekeeper, Nancy Jane Mabe; and Stephen Hopkins .

Capt. William Garton  was a planter, residing in Lancaster County, Virginia on land bought in 1673. He also ran a coastal shipping business with his brother-in-law, Uriah Angela. His children Uriah & Margaret went on to marry and have children that eventually produced cousins who married thus bring the family together once again. His descendant Thomas Garton served during the Revolutionary War, and John Henry Garton served during the Civil War.

This volume is a gathering of years of research done by my Great Aunt, Ardath Jo Green  and her fellow researchers Mrs. M.G. “Dot” Ward , Emilee Mills Staubach  and Lake Compton .  Although they have individually worked on various Green families this is a bringing together their correspondence from over the years and further research information.  Together with my Aunt Jo, I have compiled the following volume based on her notes and documentation.

Thanks to the wonder of the internet, it is easier to become associated with a “new” cousin or two.  I am grateful to the many who have sent corrections, additions, admonishments and praise.  It it they who have provide much to the creation of this eight volume which expands upon the much of information I have already compiled.  Then there are those that just send along a new puzzle for the to scratch my head over and set out searching a resolution to.  Thanks to all those cousins who have helped Volume 8 to become a major supplemental issue.

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